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Adularia (Orthoclase) from Zillertal, Austria [http://img.irocks.com/new2012/gems-235a.JPG]
Zillertal, Austria
Thumbnail, 9.1 mm x 8.0 mm ; 3.09 cts
Adularia is another one of the gem quality Feldspars and is actually a variety of Orthoclase. The material is often found in "Alpine-type" formations but rarely in gem quality crystals. This stone is from the famous Austrian Alps and would make for a very rare gem to add to your collection. These gems are simply not seen on the market, especially in this clarity ! Most Adularia crystals from this area are "milky" in appearance and have what's called "adularescence". This stone is nearly eye clean, and shows a VERY light blue sheen when rotated in the light. The stone has an "Emerald" cut. Gems of this clarity and size are not often seen on the market, especially from the classic Austrian Alps ! A great "collector" gem, and much more than just a Feldspar.
Fluorite on Adularia from Ziggenstock, Grimsel, Bern, Switzerland [http://img.irocks.com/pics/tmix07-135a.jpg]
Ziggenstock, Grimsel, Bern, Switzerland
Miniature, 4.9 x 3.0 x 3.0 cm
This is from a rare and highly desirable locality, with unique and distinct style. Two, pastel pink, gemmy, heavily modified fluorite crystals to 1.5 cm across are aesthetically perched on lustrous, sugary adularia, a variety of orthoclase. Although not as deeply colored as some of its alpine cousins, the transparency and complexity of the crystals is absolutely superb. This pocket, or this style rather from this region, is notable for its difference from the common sort of Alpine fluorite. I have seen such pieces at Munich for twice the price, in Euros yet, as they seem overly valued to me in the European market.
Adularia and Stilbite from La Fibbia, Gotthard Pass, Switzerland [http://img.irocks.com/pics/tmix07-170a.jpg]
La Fibbia, Gotthard Pass, Switzerland
Cabinet, 13.5 x 6.8 x 6.0 cm
This is truly an amazing adularia specimen and I DO NOT normally get excited about this species. Most Swiss adularia is dull and matte in lustre but this one has a surface like glass, and is highly reflective and attractive. I like the way the large crystal is perched aesthetically on a series of smaller adularia crystals. The luster is superb, the crystals show excellent translucence, and the color is pearlescent. In addition, there are some pearlescent 1 cm stilbite crystals perched on the adularia, which is a neat combo! Also, it is ex. Asselborn collection. He had it for many years and valued it highly. This is just a superior piece from a classic and important locality. I know this SEEMS expensive for a boring old adularia but it is really that good...not just another alpine rock, per se.
FLUORITE on Adularia from Massif de l’Aiguille Verte, Chamonix, Haute-Savoie, France [http://img.irocks.com/new09/tuc09105abg.jpg]
Massif de l’Aiguille Verte, Chamonix, Haute-Savoie, France
Cabinet, 10.4 x 7.2 x 4.1 cm
This specimen if from a find of fall 2008, which has really shocked the French fluorite collectors that I know, and is the kind of rare locality find that impresses outsiders as well. The color , lustre, and transparency of these crystals is above average for Chamonix, more of a vibrant pink-red than the usual muted pink hues we have seen in most pockets of these rare Alpine fluorites. This specimen has crystals to 4.25 cm, perched on a slender shard of white , crystallized adularia (feldspar) matrix. It is a stunning association, and contrast. The crystals here climb up the shard, one atop the other. Note how gemmy and translucent the top crystal is. It has a termination that is complete all around, 360 degrees. The piece itself, actually, is ALSO complete all around the backside, if somewhat roughly crystallized compared to the front. The point is, though, that the crystals all wrap around and have sharp edges as well. In person, this has better lustre than in the photos - it seems very hard to convey accurately. It has been since 1998 and the Pt Kurtz pocket that a single find of pink/red fluorite from the Alps has gotten so much attention and produced a new, unprecedented quality. This does not happen, thus, very often. Few good specimens were available, under several dozen.
FLUORITE on Adularia from Massif de l'Aiguille Verte, Chamonix, Haute-Savoie, France [http://img.irocks.com/new09/tuc09106abg.jpg]
Massif de l'Aiguille Verte, Chamonix, Haute-Savoie, France
Small Cabinet, 5.9 x 4.4 x 3.9 cm
This specimen if from a find of fall 2008, which has really shocked the French fluorite collectors that I know, and is the kind of rare locality find that impresses outsiders as well. The color , lustre, and transparency of these crystals is above average for Chamonix, more of a vibrant pink-red than the usual muted pink hues we have seen in most pockets of these rare Alpine fluorites. This specimen has crystals to 2 cm, perched on stark white, crystallized adularia (feldspar) matrix. It is a stunning association, and contrast. The crystals here are piled up, one atop the other. Note how gemmy and translucent the top crystal is. It has a termination that is complete all around, 360 degrees. In person, this has better lustre than in the photos - it seems very hard to convey accurately. It has been since 1998 and the Pt Kurtz pocket that a single find of pink/red fluorite from the Alps has gotten so much attention and produced a new, unprecedented quality. This does not happen, thus, very often. Few good specimens were available, under several dozen.
Orthoclase var. Adularia from Vizze Valley (Pfitsch Valley), Bolzano Province (South Tyrol), Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy [http://img.irocks.com/new2011/UA29b.jpg]
Vizze Valley (Pfitsch Valley), Bolzano Province (South Tyrol), Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
Cabinet, 10.1 x 9.5 x 6.0 cm
This is a classic alpine style specimen: a large, fist-sized cluster of gemmy, translucent orthoclase feldspar crystals. The cluster is a floater, complete all around. It is unusually pristine and sharp, and very 3-dimensional in person. The photos show it in normal frontal lighting, though it has a better "glow" to it when backlit. Impressive, in person! From the collection of Hubert De Monmonier (1919-2007), donated by bequest to the University of Arizona Museum to add to their displays and to provide specimens for sale to establish an endowment fund for museum operations, in perpetuity.