New Specimens

Displaying 1-30 of 600 results.
SOLD
A historic old German specimen Obodda collection Andreasberg suite
Samson Mine, St Andreasberg, St Andreasberg District, Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany
Large Cabinet, 20.0 x 13.5 x 7.0 cm
A historic old German specimen, from the Obodda collection Andreasberg suite. These calcites probably date to the mid 1800s era here, or even earlier.
SOLD
A historic old German specimen Obodda collection Andreasberg suite
St Andreasberg, St Andreasberg District, Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany
Cabinet, 18.0 x 9.2 x 5.2 cm
A historic old German specimen, from the Obodda collection Andreasberg suite. These calcites probably date to the mid 1800s era here, or even earlier.
SOLD
A historic old German specimen Obodda collection Andreasberg suite
St Andreasberg, St Andreasberg District, Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany
Cabinet, 24.2 x 5.5 x 3.5 cm
A historic old German specimen, from the Obodda collection Andreasberg suite. These calcites probably date to the mid 1800s era here, or even earlier.
SOLD
A historic old German specimen Obodda collection Andreasberg suite
St Andreasberg, St Andreasberg District, Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany
Cabinet, 13.0 x 7.1 x 5.5 cm
A historic old German specimen, from the Obodda collection Andreasberg suite. These calcites probably date to the mid 1800s era here, or even earlier.
SOLD
A historic old German specimen Obodda collection Andreasberg suite
Samson Mine, St Andreasberg, St Andreasberg District, Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany
Small Cabinet, 7.8 x 6.2 x 3.2 cm
A historic old German specimen, from the Obodda collection Andreasberg suite. These specimens probably date to the mid 1800s era here, or even earlier.
SOLD
A historic old German specimen Obodda collection Andreasberg suite
St Andreasberg, St Andreasberg District, Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany
Small Cabinet, 9.8 x 6.5 x 4.0 cm
A historic old German specimen, from the Obodda collection Andreasberg suite. These specimens probably date to the mid 1800s era here, or even earlier.
Malachite sharply replaced azurite remarkable large miniature early
Tsumeb Mine, Tsumeb, Namibia
Miniature, 5.2 x 2.2 x 2.1 cm
Malachite has sharply replaced azurite on this remarkable large miniature, from the early 1900's and the first oxide zone at Tsumeb (which dates this prior to the 1930s). Tsumeb malachites from the first oxidation zone, in some cases, developed these remarkable banded chevron-like patterns on the surface. This sharp, complete specimen shows off dramatic patterning and has excellent color, iconic for this rare style (which I do not believe occurs elsewhere). Most Tsumeb malachite pseudomorphs are rounded by the elements, or by the simple lack of perfect fidelity in the process where malachite replaced the original azurite crystals molecule by molecule over long time, but the crystals here remained sharp - already something of a rarity and making the piece collectible even without the dramatic patterns. Such sharp crystals, on their own merit, would be desirable, but the patterning in other words takes it to the next level. ex Howard Belsky personal collection (Howard was an East Coast dealer and collector in the 1980s, with superb taste, who sadly passed away very young: http://minrec.org/labels.asp?colid=1707). Joe Budd photos.
Atacamite rare copper species previous world s best Australia prior
Lily Mine, Ica Department, Peru
Miniature, 5.0 x 4.5 x 4.0 cm
Atacamite is a rare copper species, and the previous "world's best" were found in Australia prior to 1900, at two locales. This small, remote copper and gem silica mine in the dry mountains of southern Peru, though, has matched and surpassed what we all thought for 100 years to be unbeatable status of the Aussie atacamites in our major museums. Also, the Peruvian crystals have better luster! The very best of the Peruvian atacamites are therefore worthy of consideration by any collector, for beauty and importance, though the pockets vary widely by quality and size. I have pursued these for the last 5 years as the trickle has come out. I held this piece back 2 years, waiting to see what else may come out, but it seems to have fizzled into irrelevance now in terms of more great specimens of this style. For this reason, I actually went to the mine (long story!) to see myself what comes out of here, and how the veins run through. It is really not a rich mine, and the specimens we have seen are nothing short of a miracle found in what is mostly a barren, desolate mountain with few veins of mineralization (we also had to take a "shortcut" through an army base, with machine guns pointed at us as we drove by, so it is not readily accessible to a crowd of collectors and certainly not easily mined by traditional methods of big machines and explosives). It turns out to be a needle in a haystack, and these are extremely rare in the ground. This particular specimen was mined in 2014 and has the largest and fattest crystals of the species I have seen from Peru, or on any specimen even from Australia, and seems to me to be at the top of its game for both the species, and as a competition-level miniature. It is gorgeous, deep green, and complete all around 360 degrees. I regard it very highly for significance for a rare species, but it has enough beauty and luster that the value and interest is more than just intellectual. I cannot recall Aussie pieces I have seen, with such luster, either. In any case, a major specimen and probably a record-setter of a very rare and desirable copper species. This is a masterpiece of a very rare species, suitable for any competitive exhibition or top tier collection of fine specimens of more common species. Joe Budd photos.
Mimetite Australia usually considered world s great specimens species
Elura Mine, Cobar, New South Wales, Australia
Small Cabinet, 9.0 x 6.0 x 3.0 cm
Mimetite from Australia is usually not considered among the world's great specimens for the species, and tends to be dull and drably colored but one particular pocket from the late 1980s has stood out and still stands the test of time. This remarkable pocket of green to yellow mimetite crystals came from an active silver mine, itself already unusual. Only a few specimens survived, and were of quality to go to collectors. I remember when they premiered at Tucson to huge excitement, and top collectors chased specimens down as they got dispersed. This is a very aesthetic small cabinet piece from that single rare find called the "green mimetite pocket," long in the collection of Martin Zinn and then another private collector, and so not on the market in several decades. It has rich, saturated color and a silky, unique luster that makes these readily identifiable from any other mimetite anywhere in all the world. They are unique. Most of us will never hold one, and I consider myself lucky to have handled several over the years. Leaning more to the rare green color palette more tan yellow or orange hues, this is a fine specimen from this rare find, with really good upright aesthetics. ex Matt Tannenbaum collection. Joe Budd photos.
From famous 1971 Gem Pocket crystals finest mimetites existence terms
Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia
Thumbnail, 2.4 x 1.9 x 1.2 cm
From the famous 1971 Gem Pocket, these crystals are the finest mimetites in existence in terms of sheer quality and there are only a handful that will ever come to market. The find has never been repeated or equaled and they remain iconic specimens in any collection. This is the most significant thumbnail specimen I have handled from the pocket, in decades of watching for them and only seeing a half dozen for sale of any caliber (less fat and gemmy than this, generally). The crystal is fat, balanced, and stunning in its gemminess. The luster is glassy, naturally. The main crystal is mostly translucent and has a sharp, lustrous and full termination. The crystals are partially included by Beaverite, a rare sulfate. This enhances the yellow saturation. An aesthetic thumbnail compared to the usually jumbled messes we more often see, and from THE SINGLE MOST FAMOUS FIND FOR THE SPECIES, this is a competition level thumbnail, and in fact was the cornerstone specimen of the collection of Jennie Areson. She last competed with her thumbnail suite in 1971 at the Freeport, New York show. (Her husband sold their collection of larger minerals as the Lee Areson collection). This thumbnail collection of hers then was sold intact to a single collector in the early 1980s and disappeared, remaining intact for 35 years until I purchased it recently (Her original scorecard accompanies this specimen as it was the most significant in the collection). This is, truly, a world class mineral specimen that also happens to be a world class thumbnail, of the highest level for competition exhibition or the species. Joe Budd photos.
Tourmaline ON spodumene rare association attractive combination piece
Dara-i-Pech, Kunar Province, Nuristan, Afghanistan
Small Cabinet, 9.7 x 3.7 x 3.0 cm
Tourmaline ON spodumene is a rather rare association, and this attractive combination piece is of high quality for aesthetics aside from this rarity. The crystals are gemmy, glassy, and a nice pastel pink color. They reach 2.5 cm and are perched on a pale pink kunzite crystal. It also has a fantastic provenance, as one of the earliest fine specimens to come to the West out of Afghanistan - and to my eye is unique to this day! The piece was the best thing bought on location in the Peshawar market on Dave Wilber's first trip to Pakistan with his friend Herb Obodda, back before there was even a mineral market there (in the late 1970s). Dave retained it for a long time, eventually selling the piece to John Barlow (and it is illustrated in his huge coffee table book amongst much larger and more colorful and more valuable pieces, worthy because of its unique style and combination). It then sold to Keith Proctor when the Barlow collection was broken up in the late 1990s, and on to collectors Peter Via and then Drs. Raul and Helen Madrid since that time. Interestingly, all this history would have been lost completely if I had not, on impulse, showed the piece to Dave Wilber myself after I acquired the Madrid collection, because it was in the Barlow book and I thought he might know some history on it (Dave is 80-ish, but has a photographic memory! see: http://minrec.org/labels.asp?colid=643). Most of the minerals from Dave's early collections are literally now in museums, and few have ever come out or escaped to the market. He immediately insisted on writing the history on one of my cards, to go with the piece. A superb "rarity" of two common minerals, in combination. Joe Budd photos.
ON HOLD
A stunning miniature amazing late 2015 finds known finest pockets
La Marina Mine, Mun. de Pauna, Boyaca Department, Colombia
Miniature, 5.0 x 2.5 x 1.6 cm
A stunning full miniature from the amazing late 2015 finds here, that will become known as one of the finest pockets ever for the species from anywhere in the world. There was a lot of mystery and games going on with the dispersal of this find, done quietly and through multiple dealers. Now that it is all done, I can safely say that this is clearly one of the finest miniatures recovered, and among the finest of the species. It has phenomenal luster and color, and is a complete, doubly-terminated bowtie of crystals. The pics say it all. Joe Budd photos. Price on Request.
The number Colorado rhodochrosite specimens combined fine fluorite
Four Ball Pocket, Sweet Home Mine, Mount Bross, Park Co., Colorado, USA
Cabinet, 15.0 x 10.0 x 4.8 cm
The number of Colorado rhodochrosite specimens combined with fine fluorite of any quality can probably be counted on two hands. The number of cabinet sized examples, is probably half a dozen in all time. This large, fine, gorgeous plate has no repair or restoration unlike many others. It shows off a number of complex purple fluorite cubes exceeding 1 cm, perched against strawberry-red rhodochrosite rhombs for amazing contrast. The specimen came out in the late 1990s and has been off-market and in a private collection since. Such pieces are literally unobtainable today. This is 1000 times more rare than a similarly sized rhodo pate. Comes with a custom lucite base. Price on Request. Joe Budd photos.
This important copper specimen single significant coppers come market
Central Mine, Central, Keweenaw Co., Michigan, USA
Large Cabinet, 38.0 x 23.0 x 9.0 cm
This important copper specimen is one of the single most significant coppers to come to market in my life and is from the mid-1800s heyday of mining in the Upper Peninsula. It has been preserved without damage or cleaning (which would ruin the ancient and natural patina) for over 100 years, probably closer to 150 years. For much of its life, it was in the basement of the Harvard Museum. Exchanged out to a private collector in the early 2000s because it was too big to display there, it certainly is a museum piece for other collections. Most such specimens were melted down at the time, as they were hard for miners to keep, and only the mine captains and managers had access to retrieve such large specimens as this at depth and bring them to the surface for museums or for sale (as a nice side business at the time). The Seaman Museum in the area hosts a large collection and has several large specimens of this magnitude. Almost nobody else, institutionally or private, has such a piece. It is comparable to the very best that have survived and are on display in Seaman, and it is a worthy centerpiece of any exhibition of major USA classics or important economic ore minerals. In person, it has a presence to it that is hard to convey. I have been to this mine and down into it on a tour - the experience is humbling. These came from pockets found after hours of climbing and moving down into the ground, and came up the same long way. At 26 pounds, this was a beast to lug out. It is remarkably pristine and intact and preserves old museum numbering on it. Comes with a custom lucite base. Price on Request. Joe Budd photos.
SOLD
Mimetite Ojuela Mine relegated second class status compared locales
Ojuela Mine, Mapimi, Durango, Mexico
Large Cabinet, 25.0 x 10.0 x 9.0 cm
Mimetite from the Ojuela Mine was always relegated to second class status compared to other locales, for decades. It just wasn't "sparkly" enough to compete with the specimens form a single 1969 pocket in Chihuahua state, and the clusters from here were not as crystalline as Tsumeb or other mimetites from around the world. However, in 2012, a single large pocket was hit which redefined the species from this locality and has given us a really different style entirely for the species, in quantity. Only a few Tsumeb specimens ever looked like this, in terms of shape (think, cauliflower), and they did not have such saturated color and luster. This specimen, like others from the pocket, has sparkle, intense color saturation, and a rare association with Wulfenite seen from only a few localities in the world. Taken together, we suddenly have superb mimetites of world class level from a mine which had only produced few before. This amazing pocket produced hundreds of specimens, dozens of cabinet pieces, and this one single "best of pocket" large cabinet piece, which I obtained at the time in purchasing something like 90% of the find en masse. After trimming and cleaning, it is surely among the very few of the five best large examples of Mexican mimetite, in my opinion. The others would be of a different habit entirely, botryoidal and rounded, and from a different Mexico locality as well (San Pedro Corralitos). For Ojuela, one of the world's most collectible and important mineral and mining locales, this is simply a pinnacle piece at the top of its game, and an iconic piece for the mine and the find. It has depth and three-dimensionality, and an intense sparkle to it. It is much better in person! Comes with a custom lucite base. Price on Request. Joe Budd photos.
Zagi Mountain produced consider world s finest crystallographic
Zagi Mountain, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, NWFP, Pakistan
Cabinet, 11.0 x 5.5 x 4.0 cm
Zagi Mountain has produced what many consider the world's finest crystallographic examples of the species, and on this sharp specimen it is easy to see why. The stark symmetry and form, luster, and intense color of the crystals on this piece make it world class level for the species, but it is the arrangement and overall aesthetics with the banded granite make it a world class collectible display specimen for a rare species that normally, if we are bluntly candid, is not often at the caliber to be displayed in a case with "sexier" minerals. This is actually one of the finest overall examples I have seen of these finds when you take all the qualities of the piece together, and is a stunning specimen in person. The gemmy crystals measure to 1.8 cm wide and 1.2 cm thick (on the largest). This came out through Wayne Thompson some years ago, and has been in a private collection since then. No repairs. No restorations. I am not normally so hyperbolic about this esoteric species, but this one truly is exceptional. It belongs next to tourmalines and aquamarines, and holds its own. Now there are thousands of specimens on the market from this mountain alone, but this one really leaps ahead of the crowd, by enough to count. Comes with a custom lucite base. Price on Request. Joe Budd photos.
Of specimens rhodochrosite styles produced rich Kalahari Mines late
N'Chwaning I Mine, Kuruman, Kalahari MN field, Northern Cape Province, South Africa
Small Cabinet, 6.5 x 5.5 x 4.5 cm
Of all the specimens of rhodochrosite, and all the styles, produced by these rich Kalahari Mines in the late 1970s and early 1980s, this is among the most rare. These so-called "shield form" crystals came out of only one pocket, either in the late 1970s or early 1980s, and were never seen again. This particular specimen exhibits unusual aesthetics in that it has nice edges, whereas most are cleaved masses with broken edges showing, and this piece has combined good luster and excellent cherry color. On that fact, also, there are grades of quality even among pieces of similar color: Many have a backing of thick matrix or thick massive rhodochrosite, and so light does not transmit. This piece practically glows when backlit, and light transmits well through it. (Here it is shown with only moderate front and back lighting by halogen, but with a flashlight or LED behind it will have a deeper glow). Unlike most of these I have seen, of smaller or larger sizes, not only is this aesthetic, but is undamaged as well. The specimen was originally in the Marshall Sussman collection by the early 1990s, before he sold off his worldwide suites to focus on Tsumeb minerals. He got it from the well known Abe Rosenzweig collection (1977). Comes with a custom lucite base. Joe Budd photos.
An important specimen rare platinum species crystal significant size
Talnakh Cu-Ni Deposit, Norilsk, Eastern-Siberian Region, Russia
Miniature, 4.0 x 3.2 x 2.1 cm
An important specimen for this rare platinum species, with a crystal of significant size overall for the species from any locality. The cluster is 2.7 cm across and the main crystal on the left is 2 cm across! As with all such larger sperrylite crystals, the surfaces show stress fractures from the crystal growing into surrounding matrix of chalcopyrite and sulfides that is now laboriously excavated away. It is a full-sized, competitive-level miniature. Specimens such as this are simply so far above the mean in importance, that I cannot recall seeing such a significant specimen in recent years. Comes with a custom lucite base. Joe Budd photos.
Garnet Washington state holy grails collecting USA classics simply
Vesper Peak, Sultan District, Snohomish Co., Washington, USA
Cabinet, 11.5 x 9.5 x 3.2 cm
Garnet from Washington state is one of those "holy grails" of collecting USA classics, but there are simply so few of any real value in a worldwide sense, compared to garnets from other locales. The best ones were said to have been collected by a team including Bart Cannon, back in the 1970s to early 1980s. This particular specimen was sold by Cannon in 1982 to collector Jack Halpern, who owned it for the following 34 years until exchanging it to me. It is simply stunning, with a unique robust color and a glass luster that these are famous for. However, I had never seen such quality of color AND luster in a specimen of this large size, before. Never cleaned or trimmed to modern standards, I have only gotten it back recently after a year in the lab. It is now balanced, and presents an aesthetic horizon and a good 3-dimensionality. Some minor damage (contact on the right side and top rear, and damage in the lower-center portion) is present, as on all of these, but is acceptable in context to me given the size, age of the piece, and importance in the context of USA minerals. This is a significant USA garnet specimen, with a context and provenance that makes it truly important as a specimen. Funny enough, in Jack's label archives was a note that his friend, Ed David, wanted the piece badly if ever sold. Ed was a great collector known for his taste , and his three collections had worldwide importance over 50 years of collecting. Ed, however, has since sold his 2nd collection to me and donated the final and third collection he assembled, to the University of Arizona. Price on Request. Comes with a custom lucite base. Joe Budd photos.
Cruzeiro produced surely saturated fanciest color bicolor tourmaline
Cruzeiro Mine, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Gems and Jewelry, 25 x 17 x 13 mm; 39.03 cts
Cruzeiro has produced what surely are the most saturated, fanciest color bicolor tourmaline gems, over the years. This is from an old collection, and was mined and cut in the 1990's. It is a superbly cut modified cushion with an art cut on the bottom. The cutting is high quality, and the luster is absolutely top tier. From the collection of former Pro football player, gem collector, entrepreneur, and mineral collector, Ron Gladnick. Joe Budd photos.
A stunning clean gem tourmaline riveting blue green color fluorescent
Cruzeiro Mine, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Gems and Jewelry, 27 x 16 x 14 mm; 53.43 cts
A stunning, clean, gem tourmaline with a riveting blue-green color in fluorescent light, shifting to blue tones under halogen and from the sides under some lighting conditions. This is classic old Brazilian material, now hard to obtain in stones with such clarity and saturation. From the collection of former Pro football player, gem collector, entrepreneur, and mineral collector, Ron Gladnick. Joe Budd photos.
A fiery orange red spessartine garnet superb clarity high luster
Jos, Nigeria
Gems and Jewelry, 15 x 13 x 8 mm; 13.49 cts
A fiery orange-red spessartine garnet of superb clarity, high luster, and brilliantly cut by AGTA-Spectrum Award Winner Mark Kaufman of San Diego. This is from modern finds, at this important old gem district. Joe Budd photos.
A pure orange spessartine garnet desirable color important finds early
Namibia
Gems and Jewelry, 15 x 13 x 12 mm; 20.04 cts
A pure orange spessartine garnet of the most desirable color from important finds of the early 1990s in this gem district, spectacularly cut and faceted. It has a stunning brilliance to it, hard to convey in photos - it is like looking into the most clean reflective glass you can imagine. For more on this true Namibian find of "mandarin garnet," you can google various gem data sites: These were found between 1991 to 1992, and the deposit is now exhausted. Old material, now hard to obtain, from the collection of former Pro football player, gem collector, entrepreneur, and mineral collector, Ron Gladnick. Joe Budd photos. One good quote I found online is this: Prior to the 1990s, spessartine was classified as a rare collector's stone. That changed in 1991 when an important new find was made in Northwestern Namibia. The best Namibian spessartine was such a vivid orange that it was given the name mandarin garnet, a name that is now commonly used for many orange spessartine gems: Today most orange, reddish orange or orange-red garnets are marketed as Mandarin Garnets. Originally this term was exclusively used for the spectacular Spessartines from Namibia. (courtesy http://www.edelsteine.at/dictionary/spessartin/)
This original labor intensive piece 78 carefully placed unusually
Welo, Ethiopia
Gems and Jewelry, 190 x 22 x 6 mm; 52 cts
This is an original labor-intensive piece made from 78 carefully placed and unusually well-matched opal cabochons, of 52 cts total weight, in yellow 18 karat gold. Small sapphire and diamond provide a few accents. We have sold many loose opal stones from this remarkable modern find, which is now really starting to dry up and see prices increase, but I have never bought or offered jewelry of this material before. It just seemed too beautiful to pass up...The bracelet is of sturdy, careful craftsmanship, made in India and inspected by a jeweler friend of ours for quality and authenticity. Price on Request. Joe Budd photos.
Milpillas azurites set new standard stunningly providing collector
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Sonora, Mexico
Small Cabinet, 5.0 x 4.8 x 4.0 cm
Milpillas azurites have set the new standard, stunningly providing every collector who wants one with a great azurite when great azurites used to be rare. While some styles from Tsumeb, Morocco, and other localities stand out as unique and historic, if you simply want something gorgeous and blue, than this "hallelujah find" at Milpillas, mined over less than ten years recently, presents your best opportunity to own a truly wonderful azurite at a price that would have been unthinkable for such quality only a few years before. The mine is now through the oxide zone, and few azurites are expected to come out in the future. Nevertheless, although there are many on the market now from this productive mine, some stand out more than others. This is from older finds in around 2010-2012, and features crystals with intense saturated blue color (but not too dark!) with great luster, in a pleasing "V" shaped arrangement. As shown, the piece is 5 cm tall, but the larger crystal is 5.5 cm tall if stood vertically. For the size range, and the show impact of this specimen, I have always thought it a very fancy and appealing specimen of this style, and had stashed it back a few years ago. Photo and video by Joe Budd. A video can be seen at this link: https://vimeo.com/198291235
The size coverage rhodochrosite make huge impact case ACROSS THE ROOM
Tetrahedrite Stope, Sweet Home Mine, Mount Bross, Park Co., Colorado, USA
Large Cabinet, 16.3 x 9.7 x 6.1 cm
The size and coverage of this rhodochrosite make it have huge impact in a case and you can see it from ACROSS THE ROOM. It is not just "red," but it is "cherry red, with luster" way beyond average in each of those important qualities, and with crystals to an inch. Specimens of this size, without damage or repairs, are few and far between on the market - even at the time they came out. This would date to the late 1990s heyday here. Today, each new collector or up and coming collector wants a major rhodochrosite, but generally the only truly fine quality specimens on the market are small. This is a beast, and just dominates a display case. Minor fluorite and tetrahedrite are a welcome accent, and it is also worth pointing out that for a large "plate" style of specimen, this has an unusually well-trimmed horizon line and excellent separation of the extremely sharp crystals. I exchanged this from an old collection. It was not even for public sale when newly mined. Price on Request. Comes with custom lucite base. Photo and video by Joe Budd. A video can be seen at this link: https://vimeo.com/198291458
The photos speak specimen quite clearly quite simply close gem jewel
Shigar Valley, Baltistan, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan
Cabinet, 11.1 x 7.0 x 5.0 cm
The photos speak for the specimen here, quite clearly: this is quite simply as close to a gem or a jewel as a natural matrix crystal of aquamarine can wish for. The crystal is optically clean, water clear, and with a wonderful color and the most glassy luster you can ask for in a gemstone crystal. It is perched sparingly on just the right amount of matrix, and that matrix has exceptionally large and well-formed albite crystals to contrast to the aquamarine above. Not only that, but the albite crystals curve up on and accent the aquamarine, instead of being the usual flattish, blocky matrix we see more often. This was a special pocket, indeed, from over 10 years ago. No damage, and only one clean (lock-fit) repair near the base, make this a connoisseur level specimen among the finer examples in its size and price range. The crystal extends through the matrix and you can see it actually poking out the bottom. It is 1.7 x 1.3 cm wide and deep. This specimen was obtained soon after it was mined by the previous owners, Drs. Raul and Helen Madrid, and in their collection for a decade until recently. Comes with custom lucite base. Photo and video by Joe Budd. A video can be seen at this link: https://vimeo.com/198291587
Aquamarine Shigar admittedly abundant market specimens like displays
Shigar Valley, Baltistan, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan
Cabinet, 13.0 x 12.0 x 7.0 cm
Aquamarine from Shigar is admittedly abundant on the market, but specimens like this one which displays multiple transparent, doubly-terminated crystals perched on a beautifully contrasting and crystallized albite matrix - that is not common at all! This specimen is a perfect aesthetic. It is fine in quality, balanced in overall geometry, and has no damage at all. Miraculously, it has no repairs, either. This piece was never on the market until now, as I obtained it in my purchase of the Obodda collection in 2012 (he had himself brought it back from one of his many trips to Pakistan and Afghanistan and kept it for over a decade) and sold it immediately when we unpacked, to Dallas collector Wally Mann (in whose collection it has remained until exchanged to me recently at somewhat higher value than I am selling it for here). The piece has GEM crystals to 10 cm long and 2 cm thick, with high luster. The color changes a bit in various lights, and so the video here is a more accurate representation of luster and the shape, than of color. Again, although this is common enough for Shigar aquamarines in quality, the fact that each and every crystal on the display face of this piece is doubly-terminated, is amazing and unique. The piece stands out from the crowd, and has excellent horizons and shape to it after trimming. Note again that, despite the size and freestanding nature of the crystals, there are no repairs or restorations. Comes with a custom lucite base. Price on Request. Photo and video by Joe Budd. A video can be seen at this link: https://vimeo.com/198292105
Sparkly Cherry red rhodochrosites oldest finds late 1970 s legendary
Hotazel Mine, Kuruman, Kalahari MN field, Northern Cape Province, South Africa
Small Cabinet, 10.0 x 6.5 x 4.0 cm
Sparkly, Cherry-red rhodochrosites from the oldest finds here in the late 1970's are legendary to this day for their unique color saturation, sparkly luster, and overall impressive appearance. Note they were found before, and are MUCH more rare, than their cousins from the nearby N'Chwaning Mines. They have never been matched by any find of rhodochrosite from anywhere, including from 40 more years of mining in the Kalahari manganese fields. Although many more rhodochrosite specimens came out later, into the early 1980's, they were of different habit. This specimen is from the same pocket as the iconic "Snail" rhodochrosite that has been exhibited so widely over decades, in the Larson collection. It is approximately the same size, and has the same color and luster. Like the famous piece, this has a mounded, sparkling mass of translucent rhodochrosite rising from manganese ore matrix. The number of such specimens in existence can probably be counted on two hands, and in this size I believe there to be only a handful. The specimen came from the original owner in an old collection, and was trimmed down in size to make it aesthetic, as you see here. This is the first time I have shown it publicly, in fact. These were collected in a hurry at the time b miners ignorant of the world mineral market and our taste for perfection, and it is a miracle that the specimen is nearly pristine (just a few bits of periphery wear or contact). In the pantheon of all Kalahari rhodochrosites, surely this special style, of which only a few specimens ever came out and were preserved, is more desirable even than the classic elongated rhodochrosite scalenohedral that came out later (from the nearby N'Chwaning Mines). Comes with custom lucite base. Price on Request. Photo and video by Joe Budd. A video can be seen at this link: https://vimeo.com/198292308
This unique specimen aquamarine overgrowing heliodor core interesting
Nyat, Braldu Valley, Baltistan, Pakistan
Small Cabinet, 8.2 x 5.0 x 4.9 cm
This unique specimen seems to be an aquamarine overgrowing a heliodor core, with interesting green feathery inclusions which I have no clue what we are looking at. Depending on lighting and background, it is either a really blue aqua or a neon blue aqua...in either case, no matter how you look at it, the color is truly phenomenal and special. The color changes a bit in various lights, and so the video here is a more accurate representation of luster and shape, than of color. At the time I first bought and sold it in Tucson 2005 I was told that it was a freak piece, mined alone only several months before the show. I have not seen another like it, since. It is completely crystallized around all sides. The top is terminated, though with an interesting ridged texture to it like you more often see in heliodor than in aquamarine. Despite its fatness, it is remarkably pristine save only one ding on a back edge. I just think its a fantastic, colorful, and really interesting specimen. As well, the gem pegmatite prices are going up these days, its just a good large aqua at a fair price, anyhow. Weight on this hefty crystal is 352 grams. Comes with custom lucite base. Photo and video by Joe Budd. A video can be seen at this link: https://vimeo.com/198291764